Graham Jones

Internet Psychologist

Graham Jones is an Internet Psychologist who helps businesses understand how their customers use the web so that they can provide websites that truly and deeply engage people. He is the author of “Click.ology: What Works in Online Shopping”. See grahamjones.co.uk and http://click.ology.biz.

Posts by Graham Jones

Increase your website’s business with these 5 psychological methods

New business sign

With hundreds of new websites competing against your business each day, nowadays it is harder to make your site stand out. Existing competition is shouting louder and louder than ever before. So just how can you generate more business online amidst this online noise?

Here are five psychological techniques that will help you stand out and gain that business, in spite of the growth in online competition.

read more
Category: Tips
0 comments0

Make sure your website is written well

Website-Makeover1

The way a website is written influences our thinking about that website. If your website has grammatical errors or spelling mistakes, people will think less of you. Even if we think “everyone knows” that we are using “text speak” or “internet language” for convenience and that none of us actually speak like that, it turns out that using such language could impact on your business reputation.

read more
Category: eBusiness | Tips
0 comments0

What is your business personality?

.VISION

We all have a personality. You might be extroverted or quiet and reserved. You might like soap operas. You might hate TV altogether. There are many different ways of measuring personality. Yet we can all agree on someone who has a “big personality”. Indeed these people – often celebrities – get called “personalities”. It seems that when someone is “larger than life” we say they are a “personality”.

Yet it is not just people that are “personalities”. It turns out that we give businesses human personality characteristics. Research has shown that we tend to use four measures of a business in determining its personality.

read more
Category: Tips
0 comments0

How to persuade people to buy your products or services online

When you are in front of people in a typical face-to-face sales situation it is often relatively easy to get them to buy from you. After all, you can take into account their body language, facial expressions and so on. Plus you can ask questions and steer the conversation.

Online, however, none of that is possible. So just how do you use your powers of persuasion on your business website?

The answer is to consider the six principles of persuasion uncovered by Professor Robert Cialdini of Arizona State University. He has spent his entire life looking at the psychology of persuasion and has discovered six key ways in which we are able to persuade others. All you have to do is use his principles on your website.

read more
Category: Tips
0 comments0

Get the Colours Right on Your Website

Colour has an immediate impact on your website visitors. It is one of the first things their brains register, so if you get the colour wrong you could be having a detrimental effect.

Many businesses want the colours on their website to match their branding. That’s understandable, but the colours of your branding are not always geared up to the “instant impact” that a website has. For example, when you hand over a business card to someone, they have already met you, understand your business and what it offers, and they can then relate the colours of your business card to what they already know.

Similarly, if they walk into a shop there are many other features besides the corporate colours which impact their assessment of the company.

read more
Category: Net Culture
0 comments0

Website Visitors Love a “Know-All”

When you have a problem – whether it be rodents in the house, or a car that needs fixing – you want to find someone that is an expert in that field, and that you can trust knows what they are doing. Consider this when creating and maintaining the website for your business.

When someone visits your website, do they want someone who knows a little bit about your topic, or someone who knows a lot? You guessed it – they want you to demonstrate to them that you really know your stuff. They want to rely on your expertise in your field. In short, they want to trust you.

The psychology of trust has been well-researched for many years and one of the key components in the extent of trustworthiness is knowledge. If an individual has lots of knowledge we tend to trust them more than those who do not have so many facts at their fingertips.

read more
Category: Tips
0 comments0

How Much Information is Too Much for Your Website?

Web designers are keen to make sure your website looks neat, tidy and uncluttered. If you use a template system, you’ll find that these also make sure your pages look well-manicured. But it is not the extent of the information on a single page that is important, but how many pages of information you have.

Human beings tend to “weigh things by the pound.” We tend to think that bigger is better. Small diamonds don’t cut it against big diamonds. Small hard disks are nowhere near as good as big hard disks – even if you have nothing to fill the space on it. And big houses attract much more attention than small, poky flats.

read more
Category: Net Culture
0 comments0

You Have Just Three Seconds to Survive Online

The fact that you have started to read this blog post means that you have already spent more time on this page than the average website visitor does on any other Web page. People tend to stay on a Web page for less than three seconds, on average. Google data show that most users search for something, click on a page or two, and then return to Google to search for something similar within 20 seconds.

Few websites get more attention than a few seconds, and if you think that is bad, wait until you hear the results of neuroscience research which looked at the brain activity of people browsing online. The decision-making parts of our brain appear to kick in after we have been looking at a Web page for around 600 milliseconds. In other words, we have made up our mind about the sites we look at in just over half a second – before we are consciously aware of what we can see.

read more
Category: Net Culture
0 comments0